The Reality of Evil: What It Is and Why It Matters

From our service on October 3, 2021, a sermon by Pastor Eric Stetson. Watch video below.


In today’s sermon we begin a three-part series about evil. Evil is an important topic for any sincere spiritual seeker, or indeed any thoughtful human being to consider. Today we’ll discuss the question of what is evil? — and perhaps more importantly, why it matters that we discuss it. In fact, why is it so important that I’ve decided to do three sermons on evil instead of just one?

Evil is real, and it’s a major aspect of the human condition. It’s popular nowadays, especially among liberal-thinking people in relatively free, stable, and prosperous countries, to discount the power and pervasiveness of evil and the human tendency to fall prey to it. Many optimistic, I would say naïve people believe that evil is merely the absence of good, and that the average person is essentially good and does not naturally feel any evil impulses that exert a powerful pull on the psyche. I profoundly disagree.

October 3, 2021 Service: “The Reality of Evil: What It Is and Why It Matters”

Evil is not a popular topic to preach on or discuss. But we live in a world that is full of evil, and the inclination to sin lurks within the hearts of all of us. Throughout history, human beings have struggled to create societies where all people’s rights are respected. Why does evil so often triumph over good, and how can we change that? Today, we begin a three-part series on evil: what it is, how it works, and how to overcome it.

Brothers and Sisters

From our service on April 11, 2021, a sermon by Pastor Eric Stetson. Watch video below.


“Am I my brother’s keeper?” It’s a question as old as the story of Cain and Abel, two brothers who competed with each other for God’s blessing.

April 11, 2021 Service: “Brothers and Sisters”

“Am I my brother’s keeper?” Since the beginning of time, we’ve been asking this question. Some have said no: “I need only care about myself.” But others have looked to the Kingdom of God, in which we care for one other as brothers and sisters. In this service, we explore the traditions of Christian monasticism and intentional community. We also remember Macrina the Younger, an early Christian nun, saint, and big sister who inspired her whole family to live extraordinary lives of holiness.